Our Services

Oradell Veterinary Group of Hasbrouck Heights has been offering wellness and preventative medicine to the pet’s of Bergen County since 1961. Our veterinarians will take special care of your companions from birth through their senior years, handling all routine treatments and wellness care.

Annual wellness examinations, bi-annually for geriatric pets, are recommended to keep an eye on your pet’s overall health and potentially detect problems before they turn into something serious. As part of the wellness examination, a complete physical examination will be performed plus any routine screening tests that may be indicated. Additional services include Disease PreventionIndividualized Vaccination Protocols – Parasite Prevention – Senior Wellness.

 

Disease Prevention

Vaccination against infectious diseases has tremendous effects on reducing illness in your pet. At Oradell Veterinary Group of Hasbrouck Heights, we will create a vaccination program based on your pet’s lifestyle and exposure to disease. For cats this includes vaccines that protect against leukemia virus. For dogs, this includes vaccines that protect against Lyme Disease and Leptospirosis.

Vaccination Protocols for Cats

We recommend that vaccinations begin at 6-8 weeks of age if the kitten has nursed well from the mother. (If an orphan-vaccines should be started earlier).

  • The first vaccine given is to prevent panleukopenia, rhinotracheitis, and calici viruses. This is repeated at 10-12 weeks of age and again at 14-16 weeks of age. Repeating the vaccine is necessary because maternal antibodies may interfere with vaccinations until the kitten is 14-16 weeks of age.
  • Rabies vaccine is administered at 12-16 weeks of age and is required by NJ law.
  • At the first or second visit FeLV (leukemia virus), FIV (immunodeficiency virus), and FeBart (the cat scratch fever bacterium) testing is performed.
  • Fecal (stool) examinations are performed at 2 of the first 3 visits (please bring a sample with you). De-worming medications for common internal parasites are administered at the first two visits regardless of past fecal or parasite history.
  • Monthly internal and external parasite prevention is begun at the first visit.
  • Leukemia virus vaccination is recommended for those cats that may have any exposure to the outdoors or to cats that have been outdoors. This vaccine is given at 10-12 weeks of age and repeated at 14-16 weeks of age.
  • Sterilization surgery (castration or ovariohysterectomy) is performed at 6 months of age. Microchipping for permanent identification is also performed at this time.

All vaccines are boostered at 12-15 months of age. Rabies and leukemia virus vaccines are then boostered every year while panleukopenia, rhinotracheitis, and calici vaccines are boostered every third year. For those cats with exposure to the outdoors or to cats that have been outdoors, yearly testing for FeLV, FIV, FeBart, and Heartworm is strongly recommended. All cats should also have a fecal examination yearly.

Please remember that these recommendations are general guidelines. The attending veterinarian will make the final determination of the protocols that are appropriate for your pet.

Vaccination Protocols for Dogs

We recommend that vaccinations begin at 6-8 weeks of age if the puppy has nursed well from the mother. (If an orphan–vaccines should be started earlier).

  • The first vaccine given is to prevent distemper, hepatitis, parainfluenza, and parvovirus. This is repeated at 10-12 weeks of age and again at 14-16 weeks of age. Repeating the vaccine is necessary because maternal antibodies may interfere with vaccinations until the puppy is 14-16 weeks of age.
  • We also recommend intranasal vaccination for Bordetella at 6-8 weeks of age to guard against canine cough (which may be contracted at grooming facilities, boarding facilities, dog parks, dog day care facilities, training classes, and even veterinary hospitals). This vaccine is repeated by injection at 10-12 weeks of age.
  • Rabies vaccine is given at 12-16 weeks of age and is required by NJ law.
  • Deworming medications for common internal parasites are administered at the first two visits regardless of past fecal or parasite history
  • Monthly internal and external parasite preventatives are begun at the first visit.
  • Leptospira vaccination is recommended for those dogs that may spend time outdoors, all hunting dogs, and especially those that may drink from puddles, ponds or streams. This vaccine is given at 10-12 weeks of age and repeated at 14-16 weeks of age.
  • Lyme vaccination is recommended for those dogs that may spend time in areas where deer may be present and/or where tick infestations are high. This vaccine is given at 10-12 weeks of age and repeated at 14-16 weeks of age.
  • Sterilization surgery (castration or ovariohysterectomy) is performed at 6 months of age. Microchipping for permanent identification is also performed at this time.

All vaccines are boostered at 12-15 months of age. Distemper, hepatitis, parainfluenza, and parvovirus vaccines are then boostered every third year. Rabies vaccine is boostered every two to three years. Lyme vaccine is boostered yearly. Heartworm blood testing is performed yearly. Bordetella and Leptospira vaccines are boostered every 6-12 months depending on the exposure risk of the patient. All dogs should also have a fecal examination yearly.

These recommendations are general guidelines. Your veterinarian will make the final determination of the protocols that are appropriate for your pet.

Senior Wellness

When your dog or cat reaches eight years of age (giant breeds five years of age) your pet is entering the “senior years” of his/her life. While the aging process is not a disease in and of itself, the physiological changes that accompany aging may predispose a pet to one or more disease processes. Older animals are more likely to develop multiple health problems; and because of this, twice a year health visits are highly recommended for dogs once they reach eight years of age.  

 

10 Steps Towards Senior Health

  1. Visit your veterinarian for a senior health care exam at least every six months to monitor your pet’s health.
  2. As your pet approaches senior status, we recommend basic bloodwork to serve as a baseline for measuring any future changes.
  3. Note changes in behavior or appearance and see your veterinarian. Get problems under control before they become major problems that require more extensive treatment.
  4. Switch to a high quality senior food that provides enhanced levels of key nutrients. If you have specific concerns or your pet has medical issues, nutritional counseling with a board certified nutritionist can be arranged.
  5. Ask your veterinarian to check your dog’s teeth regularly and follow any recommendations, including daily brushing.
  6. Provide moderate exercise. This will help with weight control and keeping muscles toned.
  7. Talk with your veterinarian if your dog or cat tires easily or has trouble breathing.
  8. Groom your pet at least once each week.  Check for lumps, sores, parasites or discharge from the eyes, ears and nose.
  9. Maintain a familiar routine and environment to minimize stress.
  10. If your pet has not been neutered or spayed, have your veterianrian examine the mammary glands or prostate gland.